the-gasoline-station:

Square Favela
Aerial view of Rio das Pedras shantytown (favela), next to Barra da Tijuca, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on June 28, 2014
Picture: Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images
Source: The Atlantic In Focus

the-gasoline-station:

Square Favela

Aerial view of Rio das Pedras shantytown (favela), next to Barra da Tijuca, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on June 28, 2014

Picture: Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images

Source: The Atlantic In Focus

wmud:

charlotte perriand and pierre jeanneret - refuge tonneau, 1938

wmud:

charlotte perriand and pierre jeanneret - refuge tonneau, 1938

wmud:

jaromír krejcar - czechoslovak pavilion, paris international exposition, 1937

wmud:

jaromír krejcar - czechoslovak pavilion, paris international exposition, 1937

(Source: focus-damnit)

flywithmelesbianseagull:

Nyoom


こうありたい。

flywithmelesbianseagull:

Nyoom

こうありたい。

(Source: theangriestcat)

libutron:

The Extravagant Black Bat flower
The unusual Black Bat flower, Tacca chantrieri (Dioscoreales - Dioscoreaceae), is quite distinctive by the strange, unique, near black flowers. The flowers, which can grow up to 25 cm long, have four large, dark-purple bracts and long bracteoles, giving the inflorescence a striking appearance that superficially resemble a flying bat, a sinister face, or a mean tiger with whiskers.
Tacca chantrieri is an endangered species that occurs in tropical regions of SE Asia including Thailand, Malaysia, and southern China, particularly Yunnan Province.
The features of these flowers have been assumed to function as a ‘‘deceit syndrome’’ in which reproductive structures resemble decaying organic material attracting flies that facilitate cross-pollination (sapromyiophily). However, a study on pollination and mating in Tacca chantrieri populations from SW China, has shown that despite considerable investment in extravagant display, populations of this species are predominantly selfing and that flowers have several traits that promote autonomous self-pollination.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Stephanie Lichlyter 
Locality: Cultivated (Conservatory of Flowers, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California, US)

libutron:

The Extravagant Black Bat flower

The unusual Black Bat flower, Tacca chantrieri (Dioscoreales - Dioscoreaceae), is quite distinctive by the strange, unique, near black flowers. The flowers, which can grow up to 25 cm long, have four large, dark-purple bracts and long bracteoles, giving the inflorescence a striking appearance that superficially resemble a flying bat, a sinister face, or a mean tiger with whiskers.

Tacca chantrieri is an endangered species that occurs in tropical regions of SE Asia including Thailand, Malaysia, and southern China, particularly Yunnan Province.

The features of these flowers have been assumed to function as a ‘‘deceit syndrome’’ in which reproductive structures resemble decaying organic material attracting flies that facilitate cross-pollination (sapromyiophily). However, a study on pollination and mating in Tacca chantrieri populations from SW China, has shown that despite considerable investment in extravagant display, populations of this species are predominantly selfing and that flowers have several traits that promote autonomous self-pollination.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Stephanie Lichlyter

Locality: Cultivated (Conservatory of Flowers, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California, US)

subtilitas:

Construction of Eladio Dieste's Church of the Christ Worker in Estación Atlántida, (completed in 1960) showing the impossibly thin undulating brick walls and roof. It's hard to fathom the design of this structural system by today's standards; but the fact this was completed decades before computer programs, using masonry in ways that had never been done before, and constructed by local tradesmen in a small Uruguayan village is truly astounding. Image via, and previously on Dieste.

subtilitas:

Construction of Eladio Dieste's Church of the Christ Worker in Estación Atlántida, (completed in 1960) showing the impossibly thin undulating brick walls and roof. It's hard to fathom the design of this structural system by today's standards; but the fact this was completed decades before computer programs, using masonry in ways that had never been done before, and constructed by local tradesmen in a small Uruguayan village is truly astounding. Image via, and previously on Dieste.

seshatarchitecture:

Gurunsi architecture in Burkina Faso and Ghana